Boston Proposal  Photography
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Boston Proposal Photography


A lot of people find my photography for Boston proposal Photographers by simply looking for great photos! Having worked in and around the Boston area, I have taken photos of engagements at places such as Boston Public Gardens, Seaport and even at some of the local colleges like Brandeis University.

Getting engaged requires a bit of planning and understanding of what a significant other proposing is to do. First, they need to buy an engagement ring. There are many types of engagement rings, but the most common is the diamond engagement ring.

The significance of the diamond ring is that it represents an agreement for future marriage. Why diamonds though? Well, haven’t you heard? “Diamonds are a girl's best friend!” That’s why! If you know that slogan, you are well on your way to knowing when you get engaged, most likely you’ll get a diamond.

DeBeers started a marketing ploy “a diamond is forever”. The ad ran for decades and now 75% of people getting married are proposed to with a diamond!

There are different types of diamonds

  • White Diamonds.
  • Champagne Diamonds.
  • Pink Champagne Diamonds.
  • Yellow Diamonds.
  • Blue Diamonds.
  • Green Diamonds.
  • Purple Diamonds.
  • Synthetic Diamonds.

If you get that far, you then need to figure out what type of setting you to want to put your diamond in.

There are so many settings and the most common and well-known is the Channel Set Diamond. Also popular is the prong set ring, where the diamond is placed between 4 and 6 prongs to allow it to sparkle from all angles.

Types of settings for Diamond Rings


  • BAR SETTING.
  • CLUSTER SETTING
  • BEZEL SETTING.
  • TENSION SETTING.
  • GYPSY SETTING.
  • ILLUSION SETTING.


Here in Boston, we know the other setting called the “Boston Setting” . It is when you have two small stones on the outside of the main stone. It’s very pretty!

ROUND CUT DIAMOND

Round diamonds account for over two-thirds of diamonds sold, making it the most popular shape on this list. With 58 facets, the brilliance of a round diamond is incomparable. Its classic style and ultimate shine are what make this shape so desirable.


PRINCESS CUT DIAMOND

One of the more popular cuts


EMERALD CUT DIAMOND

Emerald cut diamonds are rectangle shipped. They are longer on the sides that run along your finger and shorter on the side that goes across your


ASSCHER CUT DIAMOND

Is such an interesting cut diamond! It looks like there are steps inside, and the diamond is going down to a landing. In true terms, it’s called the step cut for a reason


RADIANT CUT DIAMOND

Is at times longer in length, and is cut underneath to give a greater sparkle The edges are typically beveled to give it an outlined look.


OVAL DIAMOND

Just like its name, it is an Oval shape which helps the diamond appear bigger! (Who doesn’t want that!)


MARQUISE DIAMOND

The Marquise’s elongated shape flatters the hand and catches the eye of many due to its unique features. It has been around for centuries, making it one of the most timeless shapes one could wear.


PEAR SHAPE DIAMOND

Most people refer to this as the teardrop shape. It looks like a tear.


CUSHION

This diamond is in the shape of a square but kind of looks like a big fluffy pillow with all its sparkles.


HEART

Also, true to its name, you can get a heart shape diamond.



Where can you buy a diamond ring? Well, you can find a jewelry store in your local town, or here in Massachusetts, you can go to the Jewelers Building in Boston on Washington Street. I have a personal connection to the 4th Floor Jewelers at Santisi and Bove. https://santisiandbove.com/jewelry/. The owners sold my father my mom's engagement ring back in the day. To this day they still swear my dad bought the prettiest diamond they ever had!

The jewelers building is Boston’s go-to for anyone getting engaged. You have so many choices and the ability to price shop!


Once you find the store that you want, you then have to decide the diamond, what color, what clarity, and what cut also known as the four Cs!


When discussing engagement rings, you may often hear of “the Four C’s”. This is in reference to the different factors to consider when shopping for a diamond.



Carat

A diamond’s carat is its weight. While a larger carat indicates a larger size diamond, the cut of the diamond also plays an important part (as a smaller carat may appear “larger” depending on the cut).



Cut

The cut of a diamond applies to the proportion and symmetrical shape of the diamond and how light passes through and impacts the brightness of the stone.



Color

Diamonds are color-rated starting at “D” (near colorless) through Z (noticeable color). The lower in the alphabet you go, the more color that is attributed to the stone (light yellow and/or brown).


Clarity

Diamonds come from nature, and when created, may contain some other elements (called “inclusions”) that impact the clarity of a diamond.


Diamond Rating scale




  • Flawless: No inclusions or blemishes are visible to a diamond grader. Note: Flawless diamonds are rare as it is almost impossible to find a diamond 100% free of inclusions.
  • Internally Flawless: Small surface blemishes may be visible under a microscope; the diamond is visually clean.
  • Very Very Slightly Included (“VVS1”, “VVS2”): Minuscule inclusions are present that are difficult for a trained eye to see when magnified.
  • Very Slightly Included (“VS1”, “VS2”; When magnified, minor inclusions are more difficult to see for VS1 diamond and easier to see for VS2.
  • Slightly Included (“S11”, “S12”): Inclusions are visible when magnified; however, S12 inclusions may be visible to a knowledgeable eye when viewed from the side
  • Included (“I1”, “I2”, and “I3): There are obvious inclusions that could impact the diamond’s beauty.


While not part of the original “four”, there is a fifth “C" that refers to cost. The cost of a diamond will depend on all of the above factors. Diamonds higher on the clarity scale that have less color will be more expensive than diamonds with VS1 with slight coloring applied. A skilled jeweler can walk you through how the factors impact the cost and what is right for you.

What should you typically spend on a diamond ring?



I have to be honest, I am not sure who came up with this rule, but they say you should spend 2 months' salary on a diamond ring. They say if you make over $150K you should spend roughly $22,000 on a diamond.



Regardless of the diamond, you select, your future spouse will love it when you propose!

Location: Bunker Hill Monument, Charlestown Massachusetts.

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